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Telford Publications has published the first ten books in a projected twenty-book series entitled "Williamsburg in Character" all authored by George T. Morrow, II. The series focuses on people living in Williamsburg during the Revolution, some well known, like George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Patrick Henry; some, like Kitty Eustace Blair, Lord Dunmore, Arthur Lee and Robert Carter Nicholas either totally new to readers or presented in a new light.



The first book in the series, A Cock and Bull for Kitty, deals with the case of Blair v. Blair, a lawsuit arising out of the scandalous affair between the colony's last royal governor, Lord Dunmore and nineteen-year-old Kitty Eustace Blair. Writing in the preface, Colonial Williamsburg Vice President James Horn, says, "It was, as Morrow asserts, a newspaperman's dream,involving a wealthy and long established family of impeccable reputation, a distressed, young and attractive wife, and the most intimate sexual details pertaining to the newlyweds. The upshot turns out to be as unpredictable as the causes of the action in the first place."

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The second book, entitled The Greatest Lawyer That Ever Lived: Patrick Henry at the Bar of History, answers the question of how Henry became, in Thomas Jefferson's words, "the greatest orator that ever lived." In the second half of the book, entitled "Patrick Henry and the Puffing Squirt", the narrative unfolds, with relentless logic, Jefferson's plot to destroy Henry's character for generations of Americans unborn. Richard Schumann, Colonial Williamsburg's Patrick Henry, says, "George Morrow delves into aspects of Jefferson's character that no others have. Were Henry to read this work, he might very well be heard to say, 'Vindication and redemption at last!'"

TEMPORARILY SOLD OUT!
Due to popular demand, the 1st Edition of "The Greatest Lawyer" is no longer available. A 2d edition of "The Greatest Lawyer" with new material on Patrick Henry and slavery is expected to be available in August. If you wish to be notified of its publication, please visit the "Contact Us" page and hit the link to send an email to us with this request. Thanks for your patience and support for our books!

The third book in the series, entitled, The Day They Buried Great Britain: Francis Fauquier, Lord Botetourt and The Fate of Nations, explores the characters of Francis Fauquier and Norborne Berkeley (Lord Botetourt), the two royal governors who ruled Virginia prior to Lord Dunmore, the colony's much-reviled last governor, who fled to the British warship HMS Fowey on the eve of the Revolution. Both Fauquier and Botetourt were beloved by Virginians, but they differed vastly in their management style and competence. As Roger Hudson writes in his Preface, " History has been obliging in juxtaposing Francis Fauquier and Norborne Berkeley, Lord Botetourt, and George Morrow makes the most of the opportunity when comparing these successive governors of Virginia . . .. Fauquier was a failure, a classic example of what happens when an ambassador or colonial civil servant takes on local coloring where he has been posted, and "goes native." Botetourt on the other hand was suave, patrician competence personified, a very safe pair of hands, though ones with an iron grip when necessary."

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The fourth book in the series, Williamsburg at Dawn, is about Arthur Lee, the youngest and most radical of the famous Lee brothers that included Richard Henry Lee and Francis Lightfoot Lee, both Signers of the Declaration of Independence. Arthur Lee's two years in Williamsburg (1766-1768) were marked by acrimony, with Lee challenging James Mercer, a local lawyer, to a duel. The duel (for which Mercer failed to appear) was followed by a fistfight in Charlton's Coffeehouse (which Lee lost) and a newspaper essay by Lee warning of a British plot against America. Of greater historical interest is Lee's proposal, made on the eve of the duel, to abolish slavery in Virginia -- the only such proposal by a Virginian prior to the Revolution.

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The fifth book, entitled Of Heretics, Traitors and True Believers: The War for the Soul of Williamsburg, tells the story of a loose-talking clergyman, the Rev. Samuel Henley; Virginia's loyalist Attorney General of doubtful character, John Randolph; and its patriotic Treasurer, Robert Carter Nicholas, who only wants to preserve his beloved English Church and Constitution-- these are the principal characters in the battle for the soul of Williamsburg. The story begins with a lengthy newspaper dispute between Henley and Nicholas on Henley's fitness to become rector of Bruton Parish Church. It is followed by Rev. Henley's trial on a charge of heresy and more name-calling in the Virginia Gazette. Nicholas then trains his powerful gun on the Attorney General whose pompous Plea for Moderation elicits what one scholar has called "the detonation of Robert Carter Nicholas" - a reaction that seem fully justified, given Randolph's disloyalty and Henley's later conduct as revealed in a "A Scandalous Sequel," the last chapter of the book. The outcome was as epochal as the characters were ill-starred: disgrace and exile for Henley and Randolph, radicalization and early death for Nicholas who tipped Virginia toward rebellion. This is NOT a book for children.

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George Washington and the Immortal Moment, the sixth book in the series, is the story of 1781. The worst year of the war. A year so bad that Washington has begun to prepare his defense to the inevitable post war inquiry into his conduct as commander in chief. A year of victory. A victory so devastating that Lord North will instantly cry, "Oh God, it is all over!" A year when America will finally secure her independence and the face of Washington will become an icon.

The first section of the book, "His Greatest Victory," is a preview of the siege of Yorktown, as a military campaign, and as the ultimate test of Washington's legendary self-control. In "George Washington and the Immortal Moment," the focus shifts to the campaign itself, viewed here as a French-orchestrated "deliverance" of both the army and its beleaguered commander in chief. Thanks to Yorktown, America will have its independence and Washington will preserve his good name – while achieving an unexpected new dignity as George III’s nominee for "the greatest man in the world." In section three, "The Man Behind the Face," the author returns to the war within Washington himself, concluding that the grim-faced, emotionally-spent Washington of Gilbert Stuart bears little resemblance to the man.

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The seventh book in the series, We Must Fight! is the story behind Patrick Henry’s famous “Give me liberty or give me death!” speech – the motive behind Dunmore’s many provocations, the revelation of Dunmore’s and Henry’s shared desire “to bring on a war as soon as possible” and a long-overdue account of the tragedy that powered the speech.

The bête noir in Dunmore’s war against Virginia was always Patrick Henry, who, when he was not responding to one of his Lordship’s outrages was devising one of his own. John Page, a Council member who knew them both, would later say that Patrick Henry “did actually bully [Lord Dunmore],” adding that “they appeared to me to be mutually afraid of each other.” Was it fear of Henry that caused the Governor to abandon the palace in the middle of the night? Was it respect for the Crown that caused Henry to suspend his march on Williamsburg? Whatever the case, the private war between Lord Dunmore and Patrick Henry would go a long way toward deciding the course of the revolution in Virginia.

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"War!", the 8th book in the Williamsburg in Character series, War! is about war on a small scale, less about people dying than people just being people. Lord Dunmore’s worst defect, bad judgment, is a foil for Patrick Henry’s greatest virtue, intrepidity. The grudge match between good and evil fades to the spectacle of an “humane good man,” as one loyalist termed Dunmore, laboring to turn himself into a “monster,” even as his bête noir, Henry, is putting down a mutiny of his own men. This is truly his finest hour. Having twice exploited the sottish ineptitude of the rebel leader Col. Hutchings at Kemp’s Landing, Dunmore is inclined to “venture something” in a bloody fiasco at Great Bridge – only to compound his error at Gwynn’s Island, a horror beyond even his powers of circumlocution. From time to time, the arch villain is replaced by the comic figure from Italian farce: Dunmore, sputtering with rage after being blown (or pushed) off his quarterdeck during a hurricane; Dunmore, signing off from Virginia in July of 1776 in a stentorian ecstasy of rage, frustration and disgust: “I have done! DUNMORE

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"A Wound on His Spirit", is the 9th book in the Williamsburg in Character series. The year is 1781, Thomas Jefferson is Governor and Virginia is enduring its third British invasion. The legislature, led by Patrick Henry, has fled to avoid capture by Col. Banastre Tarleton’s dragoons, while Jefferson, warned of their approach, has found himself obliged to make a pretty good imitation of a panicky plunge into the shrubbery at Monticello, an act which will later occasion a legislative inquiry into his fitness to be governor. Jefferson will emerge from the inquiry with his good name intact, but with “a wound on [his] spirit.” For this, he will blame Patrick Henry. For his failures as Governor of Virginia, scholars will blame the times, while insisting that he be held to a lower standard than that of “a high-powered modern executive.”

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"The Old Conjurer's Last Trick", is the 10th book in the Williamsburg in Character series. This is a story about the feuds between the members of the American Mission that negotiated the alliance that won the Revolutionary War. Most readers will remember the “Silas Deane Affair” in which Arthur Lee, notable to readers of this series for his newspaper war with James and John Mercer (Williamsburg At Dawn), secured Silas Deane’s recall from Paris on a charge of malfeasance. Readers may be less familiar with the feud between Arthur Lee and the other American negotiator, Benjamin Franklin, a feud marked by vicious recriminations on both sides, with Franklin eventually triumphing over the man he called his “most malicious enemy.” Yet a question remains: Was Lee insanely suspicious, as Franklin claimed and as many historians believe, or was he the victim of a cunning plot to impugn his character before Congress and with generations unborn? Readers may be surprised at the answer.

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